Currently viewing the tag: "paleo diet"

This infographic comes courtesy of medicalbillingandcoding.org, and provides me with no small amount of amusement since it actually cited this blog and the Paleo Community Surveys which I’ve conducted.

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I haven’t done a book review in a while, and since there have been quite a few new ones lately I figured I should probably take a look at some of them and see how good they are. It was an easy decision to crack open Dean Dwyer’s “Make Shift Happen” because I consider him a friend and colleague of sorts.

I’ve only spoken with Dean over Skype and exchanged emails about various projects, but he is the kind of person that befriending is difficult to avoid. It definitely has something to do with his great sense of humor and funny self-deprecating manner, but probably more than anything you can just tell from his writing and speech that he has a great passion for what he does. One can’t help but root for him and follow along with what he’s up to.

So, Dean wrote a book. And, it’s really, really good. I’ll try to elucidate succinctly why I believe it is so.

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Within the paleo community, carbohydrates are shifting somewhere between poison and panacea. Thought-leaders like Gary Taubes and Dr. Robert Lustig, have painted a picture where carbohydrate, probably more so sugar, when eaten to excess can cause severe health issues (type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obesity, etc). On the other hand, a noticeably increasing cadre of bloggers and researchers are doing a 180 degree turn, and placing more emphasis on issues related to carbohydrate deficiency, such as thyroid health.

What I have observed, is a not insignificant amount of people who eat diets which hover around near total exclusion of either carbs or fats. You have the 80-10-10′s (ratio of carbs to protein to fat), and then there are the neo-caveman carnivores, emulating a supposed Inuit diet or eating just meat and fat.

Are these types of diets advisable?

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Language is important. Linguistics, speech, terminology, taxonomy, nomenclature, it seems like there is a whole vocabulary (another language term) for just talking about words. It’s a key component of all of our daily lives, and probably one of the most important characteristics of the human species.

With that being said, it should be a given that choosing one’s words properly is essential for ensuring successful communication. A message can easily become confusing or misunderstood if inappropriate terminology is used during a conversation. You don’t need to have a marketing degree to figure that out.

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First of all, I’d like to say thank you to everybody who participated in this year’s paleo community survey, especially those who helped to get the word out to others by sharing links and writing blog posts. I think the survey went off pretty well, and we were able to collect a great amount of data. I think the suggestions for changes from last year worked out superbly, and I received a couple of reports/emails from people having difficulty. Links to the different survey report sections are provided in the this article.

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The Internet is a great place to go if you’re looking for a solution. It doesn’t matter what kind of problem you have, somebody is bound to have crafted a solution that they will tell you will fix all of your issues. Even if your problem is that you are surfing around on the Internet too much, yeah there’s an app for that.

And as humans go, we love to create complex solutions to otherwise simple issues. But, can the reverse be true? Sometimes the most complex of issues can have surprisingly simple fixes.

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Acne is the scourge of adolescence. Scores of kids begin their ascent into adulthood with the appearance of blemishes and pimples all over their faces and bodies. Common antidotes like cleaning pads and exfoliation products fill up the medicine cabinets of bathrooms, while more severe prescriptions such as tetracycline and creams containing benzoyl peroxide are invoked as a last ditch attempt to keep the blight at bay.

It’s just a part of growing up, right? Well, maybe for modern people, but certainly not for everyone, and definitely not for indigenous peoples living in their traditional manner.

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I recently stumbled upon an article discussing a Swiss reality show “The Lake Dwellers of Pfyn” organized in 2009, in which 10 people lived on a supposed stone age diet. Inadvertently, one of the conditions was that they would not be able to brush their teeth for four weeks due to a lack of hygienic equipment, and researchers at the Universities of Bern and Zürich used this opportunity to study their teeth.

The thing is, their diet was not really paleo as most people would regard it, since it apparently contained a fair bit of grains, even if of a more ancient type. Even so, the results of the experiment might surprise you.

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While watching the complete set of episodes of I-Caveman, featuring the affable Robb Wolf, I was really struck by the pervasiveness of the modern distaste for unconventional foods. One participant actually chose to continue starving over eating some wild caught fish!

Paleo-style eating entails more than removing some of the problematic neolithic foods that populate our food supply. It also means reincorporating foods which have long been relegated to third-world cuisine.

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What if the evidence for eating a paleo diet wasn’t so compelling. Would I still try to eat that way?

The modern food production system is a very tricky maze to navigate. Corporate pressure to squelch information that may expose innovative agricultural products as dangerous is a very real problem. Even if there is nothing innately bad about grains and legumes, are the genetically modified derivatives of these staples really safe for us to consume?

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In the paleo-sphere and ancestral nutrition circles there has always been a lot of discussion about fructose. Ever since Dr. Lustig’s instructive lecture on sugar and disease [1] went viral on YouTube, fructose has become the boogey man lurking in peoples’ kitchen pantries.

He recently gave a follow-up talk at the 2011 Ancestral Health [...]

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“Who write the dramatic critiques for the second-rate papers? Why, a parcel of promoted shoemakers and apprentice apothecaries, who know just as much about good acting as I do about good farming and no more. Who review the books? People who never wrote one. Who do up the heavy leaders on finance? Parties who have [...]

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